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USPS Star Calendar for 27 April-3 May 20 April 2014

Posted by amedalen in April 2014, May 2014.
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29 Apr    An annular (ring) eclipse of the sun occurs today. Unfortunately, the full eclipse will only be visible in the uninhabited region of Wilkes Land in Antarctica.

1 May    Low in the west at sunset, magnitude 1.1 Aldebaran is 2 finger-widths to the moon’s lower right. Only 2 days past new, the moon is less than 5 percent illuminated.

2 May    The thin waxing crescent moon lies between Aldebaran, 1½ fist-widths to the lower right, and Jupiter, about 2 fist-widths to the upper left. Orion is hard to miss to the lower left. The moon is about 10 percent illuminated.

3 May    Look for Betelgeuse 1½ fist widths below the moon tonight and Jupiter about 4 finger-widths above. The bright star 1 fist-width above Jupiter is magnitude 1.2 Pollux, the brightest star in Gemini.

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USPS Star Calendar for 20-26 April 13 April 2014

Posted by amedalen in April 2014.
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20 Apr    Easter Sunday is intended to be the Sunday after the full moon on or after the vernal equinox, assuming the equinox is on 21 March. (It can actually occur between 19-21 March.) The date assumed for the full moon also may not coincide with the astronomical date. As a result, the date of Easter is determined by a formula, Golden Numbers and Epacts, and may fall on any Sunday between 22 March and 25 April.

21 Apr    Low in the south before dawn, the moon is midway between Saturn, 6 fist-widths to the right, and Venus, the same distance to the left. The moon is about two-thirds illuminated.

23 Apr    The moon is at perigee, 57.97 Earth-radii (370,000 kilometers) away.

25 Apr    Look quickly before sunrise to see Venus 2 finger-widths below the moon.

26 Apr    Venus and the moon rise within 5 minutes of each other this morning. The moon is about 10 percent illuminated.

USPS Star Calendar for 13-19 April 6 April 2014

Posted by amedalen in April 2014.
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13 Apr    High in the southwest by late evening, Mars is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s lower left, and Spica is 4 finger-widths below Mars.

14 Apr    Only 0.618 AU (92.4 million kilometers) away, Mars makes its closest approach to Earth since January 2008. By midnight, Spica and the moon are high in the southwest, less than ½ finger-width apart.

15 Apr    During April’s full moon, North America will see a total lunar eclipse beginning at about 0200 EDT. Totality begins an hour later and lasts 1 hour and 20 minutes. The moon completely leaves Earth’s umbra at 0533 EDT.

16 Apr    Low in the east at midnight, Saturn is ½ finger-width to the moon’s left. The nearly full moon will likely outshine Saturn, so get out your binoculars. At the southern tip of South America, the moon occults Saturn tomorrow morning.

17 Apr    Saturn stands 1 finger-width to the moon’s right before dawn.

18 Apr    Low in the south before dawn, magnitude 1.1 Antares is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s lower left and Saturn is 1½ fist-widths to the lower right.

USPS Star Calendar for 6-12 April 30 March 2014

Posted by amedalen in April 2014.
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6 Apr    High in the southwest at dusk, Jupiter is less than 3 finger-widths to the moon’s upper right. Procyon is 1½ fist-widths to the lower left.

7 Apr    The first-quarter moon lies midway between Pollux, 1 fist-width to the upper right, and Procyon, the same distance to the lower left. Jupiter is nearly 1½ fist-widths to the right.

8 Apr    Mars is at opposition, meaning it is opposite the sun when viewed from Earth. Mars rises at sunset and remains in the sky all night.

10 Apr    High in the south early tonight, bright Regulus is 2 finger-widths above the moon.

12 Apr    The moon lies between Regulus, 3 fist-widths to the upper right, and Mars, 2 fist-widths to the lower left.  

USPS Star Calendar for 30 March-5 April 23 March 2014

Posted by amedalen in April 2014, March 2014.
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30 Mar    Look for Jupiter and Mars in the evening sky. Jupiter is high in the south at dusk. Mars rises above the horizon nearly an hour after sunset. By midnight, Jupiter has slipped west and Mars is high in the southeast.

3 Apr    High in the west at sunset, magnitude 1.1 Aldebaran is 2 finger-widths to the moon’s upper left and the Pleiades Cluster is 1 fist-width to the lower right. Orion is 2½ fist-widths to the left. Only three days past new, the moon is 10 percent illuminated.

4 Apr    The moon sits between Aldebaran, 1 fist-width to the lower right, and Jupiter, a little more than 2 fist-widths to the upper left. Betelgeuse is 1½ fist-widths to the left.