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USPS Star Calendar for 5-11 October 28 September 2014

Posted by amedalen in October 2014.
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5 Oct    The moon rises less than 2 hours before sunset and is high in the southwest by midnight. More than 80 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

6 Oct    The moon is at perigee, 56.83 Earth-radii (362,000 kilometers) away.

8 Oct    A total lunar eclipse will be visible for much of the U.S. before dawn as Earth’s shadow covers the full moon.

10 Oct    Rising less than 2 hours after sunset, the waning gibbous moon is high in the east by midnight. You may need binoculars to see the Pleiades Cluster is 1 fist-width to the left.

11 Oct    The moon rises 2½ hours after sunset and is followed a few minutes later by magnitude 1.1 Aldebaran. By midnight, they have climbed higher in the east with Aldebaran 1 finger-width to the moon’s lower left. The Pleiades Cluster is 1 fist-width above the moon.

USPS Star Calendar for 28 September-4 October 21 September 2014

Posted by amedalen in October 2014, September 2014.
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28 Sep    The moon is to Saturn’s upper left, Mars is 1 fist-width to the moon’s left, and Antares is a little more than 1 finger-width to Mars’ lower left. Look at them through binoculars to compare the colors of the red planet and the red star.

29 Sep    The moon, Mars and Antares line up this evening. Mars is 3 finger-widths below the moon, and Antares is about 1½ finger-widths below Mars.

30 Sep    Mars and Antares are close together, far to the moon’s lower right.

1 Oct    The first-quarter moon is above the dome of the Teapot constellation, Sagittarius, low in the south tonight. Mars and Antares are 3 fist-widths to the lower right.

2 Oct    The bright star 2½ fist-widths above the moon is magnitude 0.9 Altair.

3 Oct    The waxing gibbous moon lies between Altair, 2½ fist widths to the upper right, and magnitude 1.3 Fomalhaut, 3½ fist-widths to the lower left.

USPS Star Calendar for 21-27 September 14 September 2014

Posted by amedalen in September 2014.
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21 Sep    The moon and Regulus rise 2½ hours before the sun. Jupiter is 1½ fist-widths above the moon, which is about 10 percent illuminated.

22 Sep    The autumnal equinox occurs at 1029 EDT.

23 Sep    The thin waning crescent moon rises a half hour before the sun. Venus is 2 finger-widths to the upper left. Less than 5 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

24 Sep    The new moon makes the next few days perfect for exploring the evening sky. In the south, Mars is 2 finger-widths to the upper right of Antares.

25 Sep    In the north tonight, the Big Dipper appears horizontal at dusk, rotates counterclockwise and is near the horizon at midnight.

26 Sep    You can catch a quick glimpse of the thin waxing crescent moon low in the west at dusk. The moon sets two hours after the sun. The moon’s surface is less than 5 percent illuminated.

27 Sep    Magnitude 0.6 Saturn is 1 finger-width to the moon’s upper left low in the west as the sky darkens.

USPS Star Calendar for 14-20 September 7 September 2014

Posted by amedalen in September 2014.
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14 Sep    Rising shortly before midnight, the moon is high in the south at dawn.

15 Sep    High in the south before dawn, magnitude 1.1 Aldebaran is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s right. Orion is just below the moon.

16 Sep    Magnitude 0.6 Betelgeuse is 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right this morning.

17 Sep    Magnitude 1.9 Alhena is 1 finger-width to the moon’s right before dawn. The bright star 2 fist-widths below the moon is magnitude 0.5 Procyon.

18 Sep    The moon lies between Procyon, 1 fist-width to the lower right, and Pollux, the same distance to the upper right. Jupiter is 2 fist-widths to the lower left.

19 Sep    Procyon is a little more than 1 fist-width to the moon’s right or upper right this morning. Jupiter is 1 fist-width to the lower left. About 25 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

20 Sep    Regulus is 1½ fist-widths to the waning crescent moon’s lower left. Mercury and Spica pass within 0.55 degrees this evening. They set less than an hour after the sun, so you will need to look quickly as the sky darkens. The moon is at apogee, 63.63 Earth-radii (406,000 kilometers) away.