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USPS Star Calendar for 6-12 November 30 October 2011

Posted by amedalen in November 2011.
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6 Nov    Daylight saving time ends. Turn your clocks back 1 hour to standard time. Officially, the clock hour 0100 to 0200 is repeated.

7 Nov    During the next few evenings, the moon sweeps past magnitude -2.9 Jupiter. Tonight, the moon rises 2 hours before sunset, followed an hour later by Jupiter. Several hours after sunset, Jupiter is 2 fist-widths to the moon’s lower left high in the southeast. Nearly 90 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

8 Nov    Rising 45 minutes after the moon, Jupiter is 4 finger-widths to the lower left tonight. The moon is at apogee, 63.68 Earth-radii, or 406,000 kilometers, away.

9 Nov    Jupiter and the moon rise less than an hour before sunset and are 3 finger-widths apart at dusk. By midnight, Jupiter is to the moon’s lower right high in the south.

10 Nov    Just before dawn, Jupiter is 1 fist-width below the moon low in the west. Jupiter rises a half hour before the moon tonight. Late tonight, Jupiter is 1.5 fist-widths to the moon’s upper right high in the southeast. Full moon at 2016 UT

11 Nov    The Pleiades Cluster is just above the moon this evening, and Aldebaran is 4 finger-widths below. Jupiter is nearly 3 fist-widths to the upper right.

12 Nov    The moon and Aldebaran rise an hour after sunset. Aldebaran is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s right or upper right.

USPS Star Calendar for 30 October-5 November 23 October 2011

Posted by amedalen in November 2011, October 2011.
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30 Oct    The thin waxing crescent moon is above Sagittarius low in the southwest at dusk. Less than 20 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

31 Oct    Trick-or-treaters will not have much moonlight tonight with only 25 percent of the moon’s surface illuminated.

1 Nov    High in the south at sunset, magnitude 0.9 Altair is 2.5 fist-widths to the moon’s upper right.

2 Nov    The moon lies between Altair, 2.5 fist-widths to the upper right, and magnitude 1.3 Fomalhaut, 3 fist-widths to the lower left. First-quarter moon at 1638 UT

3 Nov    The equation of time is at the maximum for the year at 16.48 minutes. This means that the sun passed the meridian about 16 minutes before 12 noon mean solar time. On this day in 1957, Sputnik 2 carried the dog Laika, the first living animal into space.

4 Nov    In the south tonight, Altair is 4 fist-widths to the waxing gibbous moon’s upper right, and Jupiter is even farther to the lower left. The bright star between the moon and the horizon is magnitude 1.3 Fomalhaut. Nearly two-thirds of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

USPS Star Calendar for 23-29 October 16 October 2011

Posted by amedalen in October 2011.
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23 Oct    The waning crescent moon rises less than 4 hours before the sun. Look for Regulus and Mars above the moon and the Big Dipper standing on its handle far to the left. About 20 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

26 Oct    The moon is at perigee, 55.98 Earth-radii, or 357 kilometers, away. The year’s second closest, perigee occurs a little more than 7 hours before the new moon, so we can expect tidal extremes. New moon at 1956 UT

28 Oct    Rising at sunset, Jupiter reaches its brightest magnitude of the year at -2.9. At 2200 EDT or 0200 UT, Jupiter is at opposition as Earth passes between it and the sun.

USPS Star Calendar for 16-22 October 9 October 2011

Posted by amedalen in October 2011.
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16 Oct    The moon rises late tonight and is quickly followed by Orion and Gemini.

17 Oct    High in the southwest before dawn, the waning gibbous moon is a little more than two-thirds illuminated.

18 Oct    An hour before dawn, look for magnitude 0.6 Betelgeuse, the brightest star in the constellation Orion, 1.5 fist-widths below the moon. Magnitude 1.1 Aldebaran is 2.5 fist-widths to the moon’s lower right, and magnitude 0.5 Procyon is about the same distance to the lower left. The Gemini Twins are to the upper left.

20 Oct    High in the southeast before dawn, magnitude 0.5 Procyon is a little more than 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right, while the Gemini Twins are about the same distance above the moon. Magnitude 1.2 Mars is 1.5 fist-widths to the moon’s lower left, and magnitude 1.3 Regulus is 1 fist-width beyond Mars. Last-quarter moon at 0330 UT

21 Oct    Rising in the early morning, the waning crescent moon is followed by Mars and then Regulus. High in the southeast at dawn, Mars is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s left, and Regulus is 1 fist-width to Mars’ lower left. A little more than a third of the moon’s surface is illuminated. The Big Dipper stands on its handle far to the left.

22 Oct    Just before dawn in the south, you’ll find Regulus 2 finger-widths to the moon’s left and Mars 1 fist-width above.

USPS Star Calendar for 9-15 October 2 October 2011

Posted by amedalen in October 2011.
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9 Oct    Rising less than 1.5 hours before sunset, the moon is low in the southeast as the sky darkens. About 95 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated.

11 Oct    On this day in 1968, the U.S. launched Apollo 7, the first successful manned Apollo flight.

12 Oct    Rising a few minutes after sunset, the moon is followed by Jupiter 45 minutes later. At midnight, magnitude -2.9 Jupiter is 3 finger-widths to the moon’s lower left high in the southeast. The moon is at apogee, 63.72 Earth-radii, or 406,000 kilometers, away. Full moon at 0206 UT

13 Oct    Jupiter is less than 3 finger-widths to the moon’s left or upper left low in the west at dawn. Rising about 1.5 hours after sunset, they are high in the east at midnight with Jupiter less than 4 finger-widths to the waning gibbous moon’s right. More than 95 percent illuminated, the moon will appear full. Look closely at the moon’s upper right side with your binoculars to see the small part not illuminated.

14 Oct    At dawn look for Jupiter less than 1 fist-width below the moon high in the west. Tonight the moon rises a little more than a half hour after Jupiter. More than 90 percent of the moon’s surface is illuminated. Use binoculars to spot the Pleiades Cluster 2 finger-widths to the moon’s left.

15 Oct    Before dawn look for Jupiter 2 fist-widths to the moon’s lower right and the Pleiades Cluster near the moon’s upper right. Two hours after sunset, look for Aldebaran 3 finger-widths below or to the lower right of the moon and the Pleiades 4 finger-widths to its upper right.